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The Most Popular Leadership Articles Of 2012 @Medici_Manager @muirgray

bit.ly/UUtCvs

1. 5 Things That Suck The Joy Out Of Employees

“As a leader, what may matter more than what you do is what you un-do.”

The secret to fostering engagement, motivation and success among employees is not to introduce a slew of new leadership behaviors, but to stop doing the stuff that drives them crazy.

From unclear expectations to unrelenting change, employees don’t appreciate being left in the dark. They want to give their best, but they can’t do so when they feel underutilized, stifled by unnecessary processes or restrained by projects that don’t really go anywhere. Eliminating such distracting and irritating de-motivators will produce a bigger return than any office training or exercise.

2. 5 Ways To Act Like A Leader

“Though leadership can be hard to demonstrate at times, regularly questioning how you embody your role will serve your leadership well.”

If you feel unsure about how to evaluate yourself as a leader, consider these five abilities and accompanying questions.

Visibility: “How am I visible to others when I don’t want to be?”
Preparation: “How have I prepared my whole self for this?”
Comfort: “How do I display that I am comfortable with the responsibilities and demands of leadership?”
Listening: “What one thing can I tell myself as a reminder to listen more?”
Blend: When necessary, how do I lower the volume of my leadership presence?”

3. Top 25 Websites for CEOs

“If you want to shorten your shelf life as a CEO, it’s easy to do – be uninformed and disengaged.”

The average CEO too often depends on information that is filtered, packaged and spoon-fed to him. Sure, you may use technology to get information on your own, but have you ever considered that perhaps you’re spending too much time on email and not enough on digital learning or engagement?

Successful CEOs should actively tune in to online personal and professional development conversations. From leadership advice to business intelligence know-how, the task of absorbing such information is too important to be delegated to others. Start with browsing your own company’s website, as well as those of your competitors and customers. Then branch out to find relevant news, research, and social buzz. It’ll be a good reminder of the climate you’re in.

4. 11 Books Every Young Leader Must Read

“Reading has a host of benefits for those who wish to occupy positions of leadership and develop into more relaxed, empathetic and well-rounded people.”

Leaders should be readers, but with so many options and recommendations, it can be overwhelming to find the perfect fit.

Harvard Business Review writer John Coleman presents a list of 11 books specifically for young leaders. The list includes a variety of historical, psychological and how-to literature crammed with wisdom and insight by world leaders. From a financial history of the world to life advice from Roman emperors, these books can help leaders chart their careers, and of course, make them more intelligent conversationalists.

5. 5 Things Leaders Should Never Do

“Too often people and companies exacerbate their troubles by their own actions.”

It’s easy to make a bad situation worse by engaging in one of many self-defeating actions. In particular, seeking to gain from the suffering of others is a bad strategy, and getting angry leaves a long, bitter, unproductive trail. No matter how high you sit on the payroll, you won’t be able to get away with such behavior for long.

Luckily, there’s a catchall cure to self-defeating habits—humility. Understanding responsibilities and limitations, as well as a desire to serve others and uphold your values will increase your ability to avoid the traps of poor leadership.

6. Top 5 Mistakes Of Unsuccessful Leaders

“The trouble with leadership is your mistakes always hurt others.”

Mistakes happen, regardless of the type of leader you are. The difference between a good mistake and a bad mistake is what you take away from it. Do you err in the wake of innovation and exploration, or do you willingly repeat the same wrongs?

Unsuccessful leaders are self-absorbed, unresponsive to criticism and quick to try to cover up their mistakes. In contrast, great mistake-makers learn and adapt quickly, increasing their ability to be more effective over time. These leaders have learned to enjoy life and see the big picture through a clear, insightful lens.

7. 3 Leadership Traits That Never Go Out Of Style

“At a time when people everywhere are questioning their leaders’ values, those characteristics seem to resonate even more.”

Think back on the people you most admire, whether they were a personal friend or office associate. They probably all had three traits in common: trust, empathy and mentorship.

No matter how talented or knowledgeable we may be, we often crave the guiding hand of a reliable mentor. We want someone to know and care about us, someone who will always have our back. Only that kind of trust can empower people to believe in themselves, take risks and stretch their own capabilities. And when they rise and fall, their leaders should be as human as they are—taking joy in their successes and gently guiding them after their misfortunes.

8. 11 Leadership Secrets You’ve Never Heard About

“Those bright lines between kings and subjects, nobles and serfs, bosses and “workers” are gone.”

The distinction between leaders and followers is dead. In fact, we often spend our days switching between both roles. Workplace success depends on knowing how great leaders lead by following and great followers follow by leading.

Perhaps first and foremost, great followers are innovators. Rather than wait to be assigned what to do, they offer up their own ideas accompanied with a go-to attitude. While still being coachable, great followers prove they have the ability to make goals and direct themselves on their quest to success. Followers of this caliber quickly earn the trust of their peers and advisors as they model characteristics of both followers and leaders.

9. 5 Things Failure Teaches You About Leadership

“Failure ultimately shapes you as a leader.”

Examining your failures lacks a certain element of entertainment, but the wisdom you’ll gather from doing so will help you manage future adversity and enhance your skills as a leader. Truth is, if you can’t think of your three greatest failures, perhaps you don’t stretch yourself enough. Failure can fuel the most rewarding triumphs of your career.

If you were never confronted with failure, you would never be forced to choose a different—and perhaps more difficult—road. On the way down that new path, you’ll learn to stretch your abilities and grasp previously unseen opportunities. As you allow failure to teach rather than define you, you’ll realize second chances are everywhere. And this time, your instincts are stronger, your mind more perceptive and your actions more adept.

The Most Popular Leadership Articles Of 2012 @Medici_Manager

http://bit.ly/UUtCvs

1. 5 Things That Suck The Joy Out Of Employees

“As a leader, what may matter more than what you do is what you un-do.”

The secret to fostering engagement, motivation and success among employees is not to introduce a slew of new leadership behaviors, but to stop doing the stuff that drives them crazy.

From unclear expectations to unrelenting change, employees don’t appreciate being left in the dark. They want to give their best, but they can’t do so when they feel underutilized, stifled by unnecessary processes or restrained by projects that don’t really go anywhere. Eliminating such distracting and irritating de-motivators will produce a bigger return than any office training or exercise.

2. 5 Ways To Act Like A Leader

“Though leadership can be hard to demonstrate at times, regularly questioning how you embody your role will serve your leadership well.”

If you feel unsure about how to evaluate yourself as a leader, consider these five abilities and accompanying questions.

Visibility: “How am I visible to others when I don’t want to be?”
Preparation: “How have I prepared my whole self for this?”
Comfort: “How do I display that I am comfortable with the responsibilities and demands of leadership?”
Listening: “What one thing can I tell myself as a reminder to listen more?”
Blend: When necessary, how do I lower the volume of my leadership presence?”

3. Top 25 Websites for CEOs

“If you want to shorten your shelf life as a CEO, it’s easy to do – be uninformed and disengaged.”

The average CEO too often depends on information that is filtered, packaged and spoon-fed to him. Sure, you may use technology to get information on your own, but have you ever considered that perhaps you’re spending too much time on email and not enough on digital learning or engagement?

Successful CEOs should actively tune in to online personal and professional development conversations. From leadership advice to business intelligence know-how, the task of absorbing such information is too important to be delegated to others. Start with browsing your own company’s website, as well as those of your competitors and customers. Then branch out to find relevant news, research, and social buzz. It’ll be a good reminder of the climate you’re in.

4. 11 Books Every Young Leader Must Read

“Reading has a host of benefits for those who wish to occupy positions of leadership and develop into more relaxed, empathetic and well-rounded people.”

Leaders should be readers, but with so many options and recommendations, it can be overwhelming to find the perfect fit.

Harvard Business Review writer John Coleman presents a list of 11 books specifically for young leaders. The list includes a variety of historical, psychological and how-to literature crammed with wisdom and insight by world leaders. From a financial history of the world to life advice from Roman emperors, these books can help leaders chart their careers, and of course, make them more intelligent conversationalists.

5. 5 Things Leaders Should Never Do

“Too often people and companies exacerbate their troubles by their own actions.”

It’s easy to make a bad situation worse by engaging in one of many self-defeating actions. In particular, seeking to gain from the suffering of others is a bad strategy, and getting angry leaves a long, bitter, unproductive trail. No matter how high you sit on the payroll, you won’t be able to get away with such behavior for long.

Luckily, there’s a catchall cure to self-defeating habits—humility. Understanding responsibilities and limitations, as well as a desire to serve others and uphold your values will increase your ability to avoid the traps of poor leadership.

6. Top 5 Mistakes Of Unsuccessful Leaders

“The trouble with leadership is your mistakes always hurt others.”

Mistakes happen, regardless of the type of leader you are. The difference between a good mistake and a bad mistake is what you take away from it. Do you err in the wake of innovation and exploration, or do you willingly repeat the same wrongs?

Unsuccessful leaders are self-absorbed, unresponsive to criticism and quick to try to cover up their mistakes. In contrast, great mistake-makers learn and adapt quickly, increasing their ability to be more effective over time. These leaders have learned to enjoy life and see the big picture through a clear, insightful lens.

7. 3 Leadership Traits That Never Go Out Of Style

“At a time when people everywhere are questioning their leaders’ values, those characteristics seem to resonate even more.”

Think back on the people you most admire, whether they were a personal friend or office associate. They probably all had three traits in common: trust, empathy and mentorship.

No matter how talented or knowledgeable we may be, we often crave the guiding hand of a reliable mentor. We want someone to know and care about us, someone who will always have our back. Only that kind of trust can empower people to believe in themselves, take risks and stretch their own capabilities. And when they rise and fall, their leaders should be as human as they are—taking joy in their successes and gently guiding them after their misfortunes.

8. 11 Leadership Secrets You’ve Never Heard About

“Those bright lines between kings and subjects, nobles and serfs, bosses and “workers” are gone.”

The distinction between leaders and followers is dead. In fact, we often spend our days switching between both roles. Workplace success depends on knowing how great leaders lead by following and great followers follow by leading.

Perhaps first and foremost, great followers are innovators. Rather than wait to be assigned what to do, they offer up their own ideas accompanied with a go-to attitude. While still being coachable, great followers prove they have the ability to make goals and direct themselves on their quest to success. Followers of this caliber quickly earn the trust of their peers and advisors as they model characteristics of both followers and leaders.

9. 5 Things Failure Teaches You About Leadership

“Failure ultimately shapes you as a leader.”

Examining your failures lacks a certain element of entertainment, but the wisdom you’ll gather from doing so will help you manage future adversity and enhance your skills as a leader. Truth is, if you can’t think of your three greatest failures, perhaps you don’t stretch yourself enough. Failure can fuel the most rewarding triumphs of your career.

If you were never confronted with failure, you would never be forced to choose a different—and perhaps more difficult—road. On the way down that new path, you’ll learn to stretch your abilities and grasp previously unseen opportunities. As you allow failure to teach rather than define you, you’ll realize second chances are everywhere. And this time, your instincts are stronger, your mind more perceptive and your actions more adept.

La salute va curata meglio, dice N.Dirindin @Medici_Manager

 http://bit.ly/WO07t8

Quella che il Governo ha chiamato “manutenzione straordinaria” al Ssn non è stata in grado di incidere, almeno nel breve periodo, sulle incertezze e sulle difficoltà che assillano operatori e assistiti. Apprezzabile l’attenzione a fenomeni come la ludopatia, peraltro non seguita da provvedimenti adeguati.

 Quindici mesi di governo sono troppo pochi per incidere in modo significativo in un settore complesso e delicato come la sanità, soprattutto se il Governo è tecnico e ha poca dimestichezza con i partiti e le lobby parlamentari, la burocrazia statale e le realtà regionali. Anche la crisi economica e gli squilibri della finanza pubblica sono troppo intensi per lasciare spazio a interventi diversi da quelli strettamente necessari per affrontare le emergenze. Pur tenendo conto delle difficili condizioni in cui ha lavorato il Governo, la “manutenzione straordinaria” del Servizio sanitario nazionale messa in atto dal Governo appare deludente.
Il principale impegno è stato “contribuire al contenimento e al risanamento della spesa pubblica” attraverso “la riduzione del finanziamento” pubblico della sanità, “preservando il funzionamento del sistema sanitario, che ha mantenuto invariati i servizi”. Un’affermazione importante, composta di due parti: una reale (la riduzione del finanziamento) e una ipotetica (l’invarianza dei servizi). La riduzione del finanziamento (legge 135/12 e legge di stabilità), che si è aggiunta a quella più consistente disposta dal Governo Berlusconi, è stata reale e tale da rendere praticamente costanti le disponibilità annue per l’intero quinquennio 2010-2014: 112 miliardi di euro all’anno. Una sfida comprensibile in un momento di crisi, ma certamente molto impegnativa, anche perché le regioni non sono più in grado di integrare con risorse proprie i minori finanziamenti statali. L’invarianza dei servizi è per contro una ipotesi di scuola, un auspicio che il Governo si è limitato ad assumere a priori. Vero è che alcuni interventi mirano a ridurre le inefficienze e a contenere le inappropriatezze, ma assumere che la riduzione del finanziamento colpisca solo sprechi e inefficienze, in tutte le regioni e in tutte le aree di intervento, pare ingenuo. E comunque il Governo non può limitarsi a prescrivere “l’invarianza dei servizi”, scaricando sulle regioni la responsabilità di attuare provvedimenti che spesso richiederebbero più gradualità, più flessibilità e più selettività. Con questo non si vuole difendere l’operato delle Regioni, in alcuni casi gravemente responsabili dell’inadeguatezza del proprio sistema sanitario (soprattutto quelle sottoposte a Piano di rientro), ma si vuole sottolineare la necessità di un livello centrale più attento alla fattibilità temporale dei provvedimenti: risparmi di spesa difficili da realizzare nel breve periodo inducono le regioni (anche le più virtuose) a ridurre l’assistenza, in termini quali-quantitativi, e a far gravare i tagli sui cittadini. E di questo il Governo non può non preoccuparsi, a meno che non ritenga comunque accettabile una minore tutela e un aumento delle diseguaglianze nell’accesso ai servizi. Più volte abbiamo sostenuto che i margini di intervento sono ancora consistenti (ad esempio, nel settore della diagnostica, dove si registra un eccesso di tecnologie – spesso male utilizzate – e un ricorso improprio alle prestazioni), ma molti temi sono stati trascurati.
Altri provvedimenti paiono deboli. La riorganizzazione della rete ospedaliera (per molti aspetti sacrosanta) è stata adottata prima della riorganizzazione delle cure primarie (altrettanto sacrosanta, ma di fatto solo annunciata e anch’essa scaricata sulle regioni), mentre dovrebbe essere successiva; e così in molte regioni i cittadini si vedono ridurre l’assistenza ospedaliera prima che sia riqualificato il territorio. Gli interventi sulla sanità elettronica (fascicolo sanitario elettronico, ricetta elettronica, ecc.) costituiscono un piccolo passo in avanti all’interno di un percorso iniziato molti anni fa e che avrebbe richiesto accelerazioni ben più consistenti, anche perché di grande rilevanza per l’innovazione e la “crescita intelligente”; e anche qui il Governo ha chiesto alle regioni di intervenire a costo zero. Significativa al contrario l’attenzione riservata ad alcuni aspetti importanti per la salute delle persone: il consumo di alcol fra i minorenni, la dipendenza da gioco d’azzardo, il cibo spazzatura, provvedimenti che purtroppo non sempre sono riusciti a superare gli ostacoli frapposti da chi ha interessi antitetici alla salute della collettività.
In sintesi, una manutenzione straordinaria non in grado di incidere, almeno nel breve periodo, sulle incertezze e sulle difficoltà che assillano quotidianamente gli operatori e gli assistiti.

Autovalutazione del Governo Salute

Bio dell’autore

Nerina Dirindin: E’ docente di Economia Pubblica e di Scienza delle Finanze presso l’Università di Torino. E’ Presidente del Coripe Piemonte dove coordina il Master in Economia e Politica Sanitaria. Ha ricoperto incarichi istituzionali: è stata Direttore Generale del Dipartimento della Programmazione del Ministero della Sanità (1999-2000) e Assessore della Sanità e dell’Assistenza Sociale della Sardegna (2004-2009).

La sanità tra ragione e passione. Da Alessandro Liberati, sei lezioni per i prossimi anni @Medici_Manager @SIHTA_Italia

Sei parole non bastano per raccontare una vita, soprattutto se intensa e densa di esperienze come quella di Alessandro Liberati.
L’Agenzia sanitaria e sociale regionale, con altre istituzioni e organizzazioni che hanno conosciuto e collaborato con il prof. Liberati, organizza un convegno di riflessione sui principi e i valori che hanno sempre ispirato la sua storia professionale.

E’ ora disponibile il programma definitivo del convegno.

http://asr.regione.emilia-romagna.it/wcm/asr/eventi/2012/20121214_convegno_liberati.htm

Why do we teach surgery the same way we did 40 years ago? @Medici_Manager @kevinmd

by  on July 27th, 2012 in EDUCATION

http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2012/07/teach-surgery-40-years.html

When I was a surgical residency program director, I often wondered what the establishment, you know those guys who ran surgical education, was thinking. Some may remember the rule that a resident had to see at least 50% of the patients he operated on in the clinic or the private surgeon’s office in order to claim credit for having done the case.

There was the emphasis that still exists today on making sure every resident did research. At last, some are questioning the value of this for the average clinical surgeon. Contrary to the prevailing wisdom, there is no evidence that a resident who is dragged kicking and screaming through a clinical research project or who spent a year in someone’s lab really learns anything about research or how to read and understand a research paper. Then there is the obsession with a transplant rotation, recently noted to be a waste of time in the opinion of surgical residency program directors.

And what’s with all the emphasis on basic science? Shouldn’t the residents have learned all the basic science they need (and more) in medical school? With all that is new in clinical surgery, why are residents forced to relearn basic science that they will not ever use in practice? When you stand at the bedside of a sick patient, do you ask yourself, “How is lactic acid formed”? Or do you simply order a lactate level?

Why do we teach surgery the same way we did 40 years ago? Instead of teaching residents how to think, we still force them to memorize large volumes of information that they can carry in their smart phones.

Now I am wondering what is going on with clinical training. A recent paper found that residents areconcerned that their operative skills are inadequate.

Last year in a blog reviewing that paper, I wrote, “A significant number of all residents surveyed worried that they would not feel confident to perform surgery by themselves when they finished training. A similar number were not satisfied with their operative experience.”

Many graduates of residency take fellowships to gain extra experience. Especially interesting is the proliferation of so-called “advanced” laparoscopic fellowships. There was a time when we taught residents all they needed to know in five years. Why can’t residents learn advanced laparoscopy during a five-year surgical residency? Are they too busy memorizing the Glasgow Coma Scale?

I recently heard of a new proposal: there may be a plan to offer “open surgery” fellowships. Details are sketchy, but the idea would be to train surgeons to do old-fashioned laparotomies. It’s not yet clear which of the surgical disciplines (such as vascular, colorectal, hepatobiliary) would be involved or which hospitals have enough volume of open surgery to support such a fellowship.

Maybe we should skip most of general surgery residency altogether and just let them go to their fellowships after a year or two of basic training.

“Skeptical Scalpel” is a surgeon blogs at his self-titled site, Skeptical Scalpel.

Improving medical care needs to involve the doctor @kevinmd @drsilenzi

by  | in PHYSICIAN

A few days ago, I received a question that stopped me in my tracks. I was giving a talk to a local church group on the importance of patient advocacy, and most everyone was nodding. Yes, doctors don’t always listen – let’s do something about it! Yes, we need to control of our health.

Then someone raised her name. Her name is Susan, and she is the owner of a mom-and-pop grocery in South Boston.

“I don’t understand why the responsibility is always on the patient,” she said. “What about doctors–why don’t they have to change anything? Patients are the ones who are sick, who are coming to a professional for help. Yet everything that’s coming about is about how patients should read more and do more research. Now you’re telling us that patients have to stand up to their doctors–well, shouldn’t it be the doctors who need to aim to do better instead?”

This question gave me a lot of pause because Susan is right. It is the doctor’s duty to do right by the patient, and that means, if there is a problem, that doctors should be the ones to improve their practice. Many doctors are extremely caring and provide excellent care to their patients. Unfortunately, there are some who, for whatever reason, do not.

In the ideal world, such doctors would choose to educate themselves and voluntarily work to improve their practice; or else, patients would choose to go elsewhere. Neither of these is not entirely realistic. First, we know that doctors are slow to change. Second, patients don’t always have a choice of doctors. You may encounter a doctor in the E.R. who you don’t choose, or your insurance may prohibit you from going to other specialists. If this is the case, you can’t exactly wait until your doctor chooses to improve. So why not make your healthcare experience as good as it can be?

Ultimately, improving medical care needs to involve the doctor too. To that end, education must begin early. As past president of the American Medical Student Association and now as a senior resident, I have met thousands of medical students, and can attest that virtually all medical students enter training with the right mindset. They want to help people; they want to listen; they want to care; they want to do the right thing. Something about the medical training dissuades them from these noble intentions, and when medical students become cynical residents and then hardened attendings, it is often too late to change them back. Medical education reform is critical to ensure that we are producing doctors who are empathic and socially accountable to our patients and communities.

Medical education reform takes a long time to happen. Health systems change takes a long time too. These need to happen–but it’s going to take a while, and your health can’t wait until then. This is what I explained to Susan. While we work on education and reform of doctors, patients can make the most out of our healthcare experiences and ensure that we and our loved ones get the best care possible for us. The message of our book is tailored to patients not because we are putting all the pressure on them, but rather because we believe each person can make a difference in their healthcare today–starting with their next encounter with their doctor.

Leana Wen is an emergency physician who blogs at When Doctors Don’t Listen. She is the co-author of When Doctors Don’t Listen: How to Prevent Misdiagnosis and Unnecessary Tests.  She can also be reached on Twitter @drleanawen.